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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How is the service indicator reset?
The oil change indication is easily re-set via the MMI screen, but what about the service one?
I service myself, but hate that pesky remonder to do what's already been done.
Any clues?
 

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You do know if you service the q3 yourself it will void your warranty and no service history you will get a much lower trade in price?

My Q3 has all its service history stored on its ECU

But back to your question you need a vcds cable & software to reset it
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I cannot find anything in the warranty documentation specifying who must perform the servicing, can you point me to it?I do have a record of all servicing, not sure why you would think otherwise?So it seems Audi are carefully trying to put obstacles in the way of those using other servicing than their own franchises?
 

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Consumer law sorted that one out a few years ago. As long as the servicing is carried out according to Audi's service schedule and to their standards anybody can do it and not void the warranty.

Theoretically a service book full of main dealer stamps adds to its resale value but as long as it is stamped it really doesn't make much of a difference in real life - certainly not half enough to recompense you with the cost of servicing over the period of your ownership of the car.

In my experience a good reputable independent garage will service and maintain the car significantly better than a main dealer as well as equally significantly cheaper.
 

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It really depends on your long term ownership plans for the car, if you plan on keeping it for years and years then it isn't going to matter if you have a full Audi service stamped up book. You're only issue would be in say 3 years if you go to trade it in, no garage has to accept your car as a trade in. They would just tell you they don't want it for their stock blah de blah.

After 3 years and the car is out of warranty you'll also get zero goodwill if something goes wrong, i have a friend who works at bmw and they like nothing more than turning down goodwill offers for vehicles which have missed just the one service outwith the dealer network.
 

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Ah yes, main dealer goodwill - the well-known oxymoron. Here's a few others...

Shy and sensitive used car salesman.

Truthful estate agent.

Scrupulous banker.

Honest politician.

 

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Too true
 

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mm5aho said:
I cannot find anything in the warranty documentation specifying who must perform the servicing, can you point me to it?I do have a record of all servicing, not sure why you would think otherwise?So it seems Audi are carefully trying to put obstacles in the way of those using other servicing than their own franchises? 
Look at page9 of book important customer information

You don't know what make of oil Audi use and i a bet you would use a cheap oil and air filter. Audi won't let you log on to there diagnostics equipment. Plus how do you put the service history on to the ECU. Audi don't have stamped service books anymore.

I am not having a go at you but these are problems you could end up with. We all know if its a out warranty repairs on a audi its expensive

Why not have the audi serviced or do a oil change at a Skoda dealer and save some cash that way


Kind regards

Michael
 

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I got a stamped book with my q3, just had my annual service and i made sure they stamped it. The lady at the service desk was unsure regarding the use of service stamps.
 

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Mrs G's A3 has just been serviced and the service book stamped - which is as it should be.
 

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reilsab said:
I got a stamped book with my q3, just had my annual service and i made sure they stamped it. The lady at the service desk was unsure regarding the use of service stamps.
Perhaps its a date issue they stopped having/using them

I got my q3 1st September 2013.
 

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Ask your Audi dealer for the leaflet

Understanding your new digital service schedule

Its for all Audi models built after November 2012 all cars built before that date will use the old system

Has anybody looked at the manual? read it?Edited by: puddy
 

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Gromit said:
Mrs G's A3 has just been serviced and the service book stamped - which is as it should be.
I read this wrong I thought you said Mrs G been serviced and stamped

I missed out the A3 bit sorry


Its the new high dose Viagra they are giving me


Good job I don't live in wales
 

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Must be a date thing then, my q3 was built Sep/Oct 2012. I've always maintained having a physical copy of anything important is a good idea but everybody's life is just stored digitally. Nothing can go wrong there... Right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some wild assumptions being made here about me servicing my own car.
Assumptions being made without knowing the facts.
How can it be assumed what oil I'd use for an oil change?
I don't see any issue with me writing in the service history book exactly what I did on what date and at what mileage. The car did come with a normal service book, that can be written in by pen. It also details the items that should be done in a service.

I used to get my car serviced at Audi franchised dealers. It is expensive, but if they'd done a good job I would not mind. They did not.
They marked as "done" things they had not done.
They failed to mark things done that they HAD done.
They failed to stamp the book one time.
I deliberately lowered the pressure in one tyre once, they failed to notice.
Failed to see a tyre below tread minimum.
Failed to top up the coolant which was below level.
Failed to fill screen washer.

The above were not all in same visit.

So after getting this Q3, I decided to do my own. I am competent (qualified mechanical engineer), and do have access to suitable parts and consumables. I have removed, reconditioned and reinstalled engines in several cars before.

It's not true that servicing my own car voids a warranty.
It cannot be deaid definitively that self servicing loweres re-sale value, thats an opinion of worth at the time, and any buyer will use anything they can as an excuse to lower offered price. Its a commercial matter, not one of fact (that the car is really worth less than if it had been serviced at higher cost by an Audi dealer).

Servicing a car is not particularly difficult if you have the facilities. I would not recommend doing this roadside. I have a ramp and pit. I have the tools.

The only difficulty I encounter is resetting the service interval indicator. (as posted originally). It apprently requires a laptop and connection cable. I understand that Trading Standards have forces car brands to allow access to their software for this, so I think I'll get it. - or try to!
 

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Oi Gromit!
I was a truthful estate agent many years ago. Mind you, had to give it up, too much pressure to tell porkies!
 

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mm5ahoEverything you say makes perfect sense, but there are 2 notes of caution to sound:1 Audis, along with most other brands, rely on sophisticated electronics, data busses etc. During a service, the dealer connects a computer to check, among other things, whether any untoward "incidents" have occurred since the last service, and deals with them (in theory at least, based on your past experience!!). If you service the car without accessing this (which I assume applies to you because you have been asking about resetting the service indicator via a laptop, cable and specialist software which you don't have at present), then should a problem arise in future relating to that item, Audi could withhold warranty on the basis that your service was not complete. If you get the electronics interface, then that is a different matter.2 The onus will always be on you to prove what you have done (eg type of oil etc) in the event of a warranty claim. Although I accept you can probably do a better service job on your car compared with Audi in respect of most routine things (and a scheduled service these days is little more than an oil + filter change, suspension/steering check, bit of grease here and there, brakes, electrics function etc). servicing your own car could void a warranty in certain situations. You may be a competent mechanical engineer, but Audi might argue that unless you have been on their training courses you are not a qualified, competent, Audi engineer, any more than you are a competent qualified mechanical engineer to work on Rolls Royce RB211 jet engines. It's a calculated risk you are taking, which only you can evaluate.
 

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mm5aho said:
Some wild assumptions being made here about me servicing my own car.
Assumptions being made without knowing the facts.
How can it be assumed what oil I'd use for an oil change?
Because they want you to prove you used the correct oil see page 163
mm5aho said:
I don't see any issue with me writing in the service history book exactly what I did on what date and at what mileage.
There nothing wrong with you doing that but your car will not have warranty anymore. Plus not having a full Audi service history means it going to hit you in the pocket when you sell it
mm5aho said:
The car did come with a normal service book, that can be written in by pen. It also details the items that should be done in a service.
Ask your dealer for the digital service leaflet! How will you test different engine sensor that only a Audi diagnostic computer can trace?
mm5aho said:
I used to get my car serviced at Audi franchised dealers. It is expensive, but if they'd done a good job I would not mind. They did not.
They marked as "done" things they had not done.
They failed to mark things done that they HAD done.
They failed to stamp the book one time.
I deliberately lowered the pressure in one tyre once, they failed to notice.
Failed to see a tyre below tread minimum.
Failed to top up the coolant which was below level.
Failed to fill screen washer.
Did you ask the service centre for a full refund each time or tell them to service the car again? You can watch your cars being serviced in the comfort of your home these day on video now.
mm5aho said:
So after getting this Q3, I decided to do my own. I am competent (qualified mechanical engineer), and do have access to suitable parts and consumables. I have removed, reconditioned and reinstalled engines in several cars before.
It's not true that servicing my own car voids a warranty.
Yes it is
mm5aho said:
It cannot be deaid definitively that self-servicing lowers re-sale value, that's an opinion of worth at the time,
Yes it is! Any main dealer will not buy/trade in any Audi that does not have a Audi main dealer service history If they do they will out it to the trade. When Audi go wrong its expensive to fix
mm5aho said:
and any buyer will use anything they can as an excuse to lower offered price. It's a commercial matter, not one of fact (that the car is really worth less than if it had been serviced at higher cost by an Audi dealer).
On a Audi most buyer will simply walk away without making an offer if it doesn't not have a full Audi service history plus you have no proof the mileage is correct.
mm5aho said:
Servicing a car is not particularly difficult if you have the facilities. I would not recommend doing this roadside. I have a ramp and pit. I have the tools.
True but you don't have the correct tools you cannot plug the ecu to Audi computer or undo Audi security anti tamper screws bolts
mm5aho said:
The only difficulty I encounter is resetting the service interval indicator. (as posted originally).
Have a look at ross-tech.com
mm5aho said:
It apparently requires a laptop and connection cable. I understand that Trading Standards have forces car brands to allow access to their software for this, so I think I'll get it. - or try to!
True but Audi has a bigger pockets and a bigger legal team plus they designed it .It's a complex machine and if you are going to service the Q3 please use genuine spares and don't buy them of eBay
Just beware when what could happen please

Be careful you don't trigger the airbags
Use the correct oil
Use the correct battery
Beware of the canbus system
Don't kill yourself with the xenon headlamps if fitted

We are all here to help each other out so no assumptions are being made and I apologies if I upset you it was not my intention
 

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mm5ahoI concur with much of what puddy says, and echo his point that we are here to help each other out. To summarise, there are all sorts of dangers (physical as well as financial) in doing your own servicing in respect of any car, not just an Audi.If your Audi dealer does a lousy or incomplete job, you have recourse. If you choose not to take that up, that is your choice. My experiences with Audi dealers is less than 100% perfect in terms of their technical competence (I had an A2 with a complexelectronicsissue, which I resolved viainput from an A2 forum which I passed on to the dealership), but I would never consider having a qualified friend service the car. I would and have had independent dealers repairmy cars (A4, A2,Mercedesand Polo in the past), such as new coil springs, wheel bearings, brake pads/discs, where I find Audi to be particularly expensive, but all such work has been subject to 2 overriding considerations:1 I have always hadroutine services carried outat thefranchised dealer, so that the service book got stamped.2 I only used third party repairers once the warranty had expired.As you said before you are a qualified mechanical engineer. But many of the service issues originate from, or are related to, the electronic systems in the car, and these systems flag up service issues with the mechanical systemsthat may not be readily apparent during a visual inspection. So without accessing the electronic fault log, any service carried out is incompleteThe reality re resale value is something you ought to consider carefully. Consider the following scenario. Someone is buying a secondhand Q3, and has a choice of 2.They both run well during a test drive.One has a self completed service schedule, like you propose, with no Audi service stamps. The other has a full Audi service history. They are both the same price. The prospective buyer willbe using the car to transport his whole family. Which one do you think they will buy? Maybe we're allunfairly brainwashed into believinga manufacturersservice history is worth more, but that is the reality of the situation these days.Just my opinion, of course.
 
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